Tyler Wist

 
Tyler Wist

Tyler Wist

Dr. Tyler Wist is a Research Scientist – Field Crop Entomology, with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) at the Saskatoon Research and Development Centre (SRDC.  Tyler obtained his BSc in Biology at the University of Saskatchewan in 2001. Not satisfied that he had learned enough, Tyler went back to the U of S and completed an MSc (2002-2005) with Dr. Art Davis on Insect Pollination of Echinacea crops. The introduction and subsequent explosion of the ash leaf coneroller moth, Caloptilia fraxinella (Gracillariidae), population in the urban forests of the Western Canadian Prairie cities and a well-timed NSERC award took him to the University of Alberta for a PhD in Insect Chemical Ecology with Dr. Maya Evenden where he worked on the role of host volatiles in attracting female coneroller moths and their main parasitoid, Apanteles polychrosidis as well as filling in some of the natural history of this insect pest in Western Canada including its complex of parasitoids and hyperparasitoids. Tyler joined AAFC SRDC with Drs. Chrystel Olivier and Owen Olfert initially to examine the role of beneficial insects in controlling aphids in cereal crops.  After completing his PhD in May 2014, Tyler joined Dr. Olivier’s laboratory as an NSERC Visiting Fellow and broadened his entomological horizons into leafhoppers and their role as vectors of aster yellows disease. Since accepting the position of Research Scientist at AAFC’s SRDC, Dr. Wist and his team have been developing Integrated Pest Management (IPM) tools and solutions to sustain the economic and environmental viability of farming systems in western Canada. For every dollar invested in (IPM) research the industry is getting back $15 in benefits. His research supports AAFC strategic objectives: 1, increase agricultural productivity; 2, enhance environmental performance; and 4, address threats to the value chain


The Wheat Midge Scourge: Decades of Combat

Dr. Tyler Wist, Field Crop Entomologist at Agriculture and Agri-food Canada’s (AAFC) Saskatoon Research Centre will take you on a decade’s long tour of wheat midge research at AAFC from the initial outbreaks of the 1980s until now. Along the way you’ll pick up details about the lifecycle of the wheat midge, scouting, and control options as well as details about the plan to preserve our single wheat midge resistance gene.  To end the tour is an outlook on current and future wheat- midge research with the potential to help keep wheat production a viable option in the event of a wheat midge infestation

Tuesday @ 2:30 in Gallery B

 
 
WheatCropSphereFirst Group